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Puliima 2013 Highlights


Monday Tuesday Training Workshops

On Monday 26th and Tuesday 27th of August a series of training workshops were held in conjunction with Miromaa Aboriginal Language and Technology Centre (MALTC),Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages (VACL) and the Resource Network for Linguistic Diversity (RNLD).

The workshops were Master-Apprentice Language Learning Program, Understanding your Language Sources, Peetyawan Weeyn – Language Revival Planning and Technology as Language Tools - Miromaa Software. These workshops provided an intensive introduction to the full training and were a great success. Participants left with knowledge of some great resources and training programs that could be utilised in their future language endeavours. 

The participants were engaged, and having fun while learning. It was also a great way for people to get to know each other. It was also a chance for people to find out about what the various training possibilities are, and then to request more in depth training.

One of the greatest success indicators was the number of participants. We were expecting roughly 15 students per class but actually ended up with almost double those numbers. The classrooms were jam packed and it was great to see so many enthusiastic people learning and sharing together. 

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Keynote Speakers

Click here to view the Presenters Photo Gallery


Daryl Baldwin from the Myaamia Centre in Oklahoma, USA

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma. He was born and raised around the Great Lakes area and currently resides in Liberty, Indiana with his wife and four children.

Daryl's forefathers were active in the affairs of the Miami Nation dating back to the 18th century, and he continues this dedication through his work in language and cultural revitalization. Daryl graduated in 1999 from The University of Montana with a Masters in Arts with emphasis in Native American linguistics.

Since 1995, he has worked with the Myaamia people developing culture and language based educational materials and programs for the tribal community. Daryl is currently the Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. The Myaamia Center is a joint venture between the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma and Miami University.

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Haydyn Bromley, Iteka Bromley, Temana Bromley and Andrea Khan from The Inhaadi Adnyamathanha Ngawarla Language and Culture Class

Inhaadi Adnyamathanha Ngawarla, is a language and culture school based in Adelaide held at Kura Yerlo. The class' sole purpose is to preserve the dying Adnyamathanha language and culture.

We first saw the great work being done by this class in Brisbane at Puliima 2011. Here the group showcased an animation titled "Wadu Matyidi" that the class had produced together. It was fantastic to have the Inhaadi class back to showcase their new project using 'Claymation', which has been used in children's productions such as "Wallace and Gromit" and "Chicken Run". 

The Inhaadi Adnyamathanha Ngawarla Language and Culture Class have just completed their annual camp, which focused on 'Claymation". They had contracted a Indigenous Animation Film Consultant who worked with students and community members in creating plasticine characters, and backgrounds of "Dreaming" stories.

All up there were 6 stories. Elders translated the stories into Adnyamathanha and students were taught to photograph and to edit and add voice over's and soundtracks.

This was a very successful production as both young and old worked together.

One of the most inspirational things about this presentation was the fact that the children not only participated in the production of the film, but also were part of delivering this talk, which is just awesome to see the youth gettong more and more involved in language work.  

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Chris Burke from Yarramundi Kids, Gracie Productions

The Yarramundi Kids are dynamic storytellers and stars of stage and screen. They present their highly acclaimed 13 part TV series, Strong Smart and Deadly, currently on NITV.

Assisted by Creative Director and master puppeteer Chris Burke, the puppets bring a playful approach to serious problems. They feature in training workshops, conference keynotes and puppet performances for professionals and for children and communities.

Yarramundi means 'storyteller' in Darug language and is the name of Chris Burke's ancestral grandfather. It is also a place on the Derrubin or Hawkesbury River at the base of the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney, NSW. The Yarramundi Kids' names reflect both Aboriginal and Irish heritage.

This presentation introduced an innovative multiplatform project about caring for country...one backyard at a time. The Yarramundi Kids invite their Midiga (friends) to observe, document and share what they see and hear throughout the six seasons of the year. They share stories, songs and dance and learn about Darug language and culture. Through the use of social media, smart phone App, live puppet shows, TV show and web hub, they come to understand the interconnectedness of people, plants, animals, birds and insects. Only then do they understand the oldest continuing living culture and the energy that connects us all.

The Midiga Mob framework can be replicated for any language and linked together through social media.

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Alyce Sadongei and Susan Penfield from the American Indian Language Development Institute (AILDI) in Tuscan, Arizona

Digital Media is growing at a rapid rate and school-aged learners are now exposed to this style of learning everyday. Aboriginal language resources are primarily developed locally and usually do not usually have the financial capacity to take them to the next level of digital media. This can leave the learning of Aboriginal languages to be potentially left behind and considered 'old' and 'irrelevant'.

QBook™ is a range of interactive storybooks designed by Kiwa Media for children of all ages. A QBook™ is more than just an average e-book; it uses the iPad and iPhone to create the perfect palette for an author's content to be viewed. A QBook™ brings stories to life in a huge range of languages that combine a narrator's voice with touchable text synchronized to highlight and sound when words are swiped or touched.

A QBook™ is a great activity for kids of all ages and helps to develop reading and comprehension skills. In a technological era, QBooks™ are playing their part in classrooms around the world, educating children everywhere. QBooks™ can be used as part of a lesson plan or reading strategy and help children to learn spelling and pronunciation. This presentation will show the process for developing a QBook™ and the benefits for Aboriginal Language learners everywhere.

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Paul Paton from Victorian Aboriginal Corporation for Languages (VACL) and Rhonda Kite from Kiwa Media, NZ - QBooks

Digital Media is growing at a rapid rate and school-aged learners are now exposed to this style of learning everyday. Aboriginal language resources are primarily developed locally and usually do not usually have the financial capacity to take them to the next level of digital media. This can leave the learning of Aboriginal languages to be potentially left behind and considered 'old' and 'irrelevant'.

QBook™ is a range of interactive storybooks designed by Kiwa Media for children of all ages. A QBook™ is more than just an average e-book; it uses the iPad and iPhone to create the perfect palette for an author's content to be viewed. A QBook™ brings stories to life in a huge range of languages that combine a narrator's voice with touchable text synchronized to highlight and sound when words are swiped or touched.

A QBook™ is a great activity for kids of all ages and helps to develop reading and comprehension skills. In a technological era, QBooks™ are playing their part in classrooms around the world, educating children everywhere. QBooks™ can be used as part of a lesson plan or reading strategy and help children to learn spelling and pronunciation. This presentation will show the process for developing a QBook™ and the benefits for Aboriginal Language learners everywhere.

 

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Thornbury Primary School Kids

We were very lucky to have students from Thornbury Public School showcase some of their school language program through song performances in language as part of the conference opening. The children are our future, they are the ones who the language knowledge is being passed down to, so it is great to see more and more young people getting involved in the Puliima Forum.

Click here to view the Thornbury Kids Photo Gallery

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Australia's Got Language Talent Contest

On Wednesday 29th August the Puliima venue, William Angliss Conference Centre, was transformed into a performance arena, where the first ever Australia's Got Language Talent Contest was held, and what a fantastic night it was! The event was opened by the Urab Dancers from Poruma Island, TI and thier performance was just amazing.

Hosted by the Deadly Award Nominee Kutcha Edwards, one of Australia's most respected and engaging Aboriginal singer/songwriters, Australia's Got Language is an entertaining parody of a competition inspired by talent programs such as X Factor, Australia's Got Talent, Red Faces and Australian Idol showcasing Deadly Aboriginal Australian talents performing in Aboriginal Language, Aboriginal Music, Aboriginal Dancing, Aboriginal Singing and Aboriginal Poetry.

Our charasmatic and entertaining judges for the night were Leonard Miller from Far West Language Centre, Geoff Anderson from Parkes Wiradjuri Language Group, Vicki Couzens from Victorian Aboriginal Corporatioon for Languages and Karina Lester from the South Australian Mobile Language Team. Audience participation was loud and proud and extremely encouraged. Each act was limited to 5 mins with bonus points awarded for creative entertaining uses of Aboriginal language in a live performance.

Delegates representing Nations around Australia and Torres Strait Islands include Yupangathi, Ngemba, Pitjantjatjara, Maratha, Katang, Wirangu, Gubi Gubbi, Wiradjuri, Yorta Yorta, Yolngu, Warlpiri, Yankunytjatjara, Wemba-Wemba, Anmatjere, Gamilaroi, Dhudhuroa, Ngarrindjerri, and Dharumbal.

Read more about The Australia's Got Language Talent Contest

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar


Indigenous Knowledge Centre Representatives featuring the Urab Dancers from Poruma Island

Key representatives of the Indigenous Knowledge Centre Network, Cr. Phillemon Mosby, Sandra Sebasio and Tyler Wellensiek and shared their strategies for programming and engaging young people in inter-generational language activities within their communities in Cape York and the Torres Strait using locally developed content and interactive tools.

Sandra Sebasio is the Injinoo Indigenous Knowledge Centre Coordinator and Cr. Phillemon Mosby is Artistic Director of the nationally acclaimed Urab Dancers, and founding member of Buthu Lagau Saral Torres Strait Islander Corporation, a cultural organisation based on Poruma Island.

As part of this presentation Puliima delegates were entertained with the rich culture of Poruma Island, one island of the Torres Strait, through performances by the Urab Dancers, and were lucky enought to recieve an encore performance as the opening of the Australia's Got Language Talent Contest. These performances showcased the traditional dance and songs unique to Poruma Island. It was wonderful for us all to experience the diversity and unique culture of the Torres Strait.

The Urab Dancers consist of 20 community members from Poruma Island. The majority of the dancers are enthusiastic youth people aged 21 – 28 years, accompanied by four community elders. The dancers are very passionate about preserving and promoting Poruma Island's rich unique culture through traditional songs and dances.

Click here to view the Urab Dancers Photo Gallery

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Image Credit Katherine Soutar
 

Puliima Pre-conference Get Together - Linguistics in the Pub

It has been custom at Puliima that we always organise a get together prior to Puliima to catch up with old friends and also to meet new ones.

This years get together was held at the Colonial Hotel in Melbourne on Tuesday 27th August and was held in conjunction with the people that organise Linguistics in the Pub. It was a casual gathering where you can order food, enjoy a drink and meet up with others who are all attending Puliima. The twist with this was the LIP mob had a topic to explore and have a casual yarn about.

The discussion topic was: Getting the message across: talking to the media about endangered languages. How can we communicate our message better to the media?

Some great ideas and experiences were shared by all.

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Get Involved

Would you like to be involved in Puliima 2017 either as a sponsor, supporter or partner?
 
Use the ONLINE FORM to contact us, or alternatively, call us on +61 2 4940 9100

Contact

Physical address 
840 Hunter Street
Newcastle West NSW 2302
 
Postal address 
P.O. Box 1778
Newcastle NSW 2300
 
Phone | +61 2 4940 9100  
Fax | +61 2 4940 9123
 
 

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